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Writing with empathy

Empathy helps you to understand and engage your readers. If you identify what drives your audience, you will have your readers in the palm of your hand.
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Learning never stops

We're all learning all the time so don't be daunted by new tasks. Anything can be mastered if you break it down into small steps - including writing skills.
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Finding your voice

Finding your voice is as important for academic writers as for novelists. When writing on a subject about which you care deeply, your voice will come through loud and clear.
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Getting quality feedback on your work-in-progress

It is vital to get quality feedback on your manuscript by approaching the right person for each aspect of your writing: an expert on the subject to check the content; your supervisor or a colleague to check the argument; a trusted friend with good writing skills to check the grammar and punctuation.
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What’s your investment in your writing?

To find your voice as an author, whether you are writing a thesis or a novel, bring your own subjectivity to your work: the filters that colour everything you think, see, remember and value - and your curiosity. This is your investment in your writing.
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Max Adams

The role of the protagonist

One of the most successful tools for doctoral students is to envisage the role and nature of the protagonist: that is to say, the character (or discipline; or theory; or interpretive paradigm) that undergoes the most profound change during the course of the work.
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To plan or not to plan?

Are you a 'constipated' or a 'splurge' writer? Although there is no right or wrong way to write, if you are embarking on a long piece of work such as a dissertation, it is advisable to devise a tight structure before you start drafting.
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